Jonathan Tyler – Tickets – Granada Theater – Dallas, TX – December 31st, 2016

Jonathan Tyler

Dallas Observer Presents:

Jonathan Tyler

Nikki Lane, Paul Cauthen, Red Shahan, Plus Special Guests

Sat Dec 31 2016

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Granada Theater

$24 GA / $80 VIP (includes complimentary champagne, goodie bag, seat in the balcony)

This event is 14 and over

Goes Great With: Black Crowes, My Morning Jacket, Black Keys, Kings of Leon

Soulful rock & roll with serious southern swagger. This is the place to be on NYE.

VIP includes complimentary champagne, goodie bag, seat in the balcony

Jonathan Tyler
Jonathan Tyler did the rock star thing.

He played Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, Hangout Fest and the Voodoo Experience. He performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and toured alongside AC/DC, ZZ Top, Grace Potter, and Kid Rock. His 2010 LP Pardon Me for Atlantic Records with backing band The Northern Lights reached No. 8 on the Billboard Modern Rock chart. His songs were featured in such television shows as Boardwalk Empire and Friday Night Lights.

It was everything he thought he'd wanted. It was everything he'd signed up for. But it wasn't really him.

"I knew what I was getting into," Tyler says now, removed enough from that whirlwind to have gained some perspective on it. "I knew what would happen when we signed with Atlantic. Then I got over it."

These days, Tyler really does come off as a changed man – in person and on record alike. He's more introspective, more focused. His shoulders are less slumped, as if a heavy burden has been lifted. It has: Holy Smokes, his forthcoming third proper LP, finds Tyler shed of major-label constraints, bearing his soul as songwriter who's seen the top of the mountain and now seeks a different kind of climb, one filled less with flash and more with substance. The album's an open look into who Tyler is at this very moment – and, most of all, who he feels he's always really been.

"I'm in this for the long haul," he says now with certainty -- and Holy Smokes, filled with songs that fill every emotional nook and cranny, very much plays out like a testament to this fact.
Nikki Lane
Nikki Lane
Nikki Lane turns the vulnerable singer-songwriter stereotype on its ear, crafting songs that crucify ex-boyfriends and have no problem with one-night stands as long as she can bolt town right after. Her cooing-yet-brutal vocals are a perfect fit with an aching, mournful guitar. Her upcoming album, tentatively titled Seein' Double—produced by, yes, Dan Auerbach—is one of Nashville's most anticipated releases. "My songs always paint a pretty clear picture of what's been going on in my life, so this is one moody record," she says. "There's lots of talk of misbehaving and moving on."

Born in South Carolina, Lane moved to New York City and, after a messy breakup, picked up a guitar and set her sights on a music career. But the cost of living in New York proved to be too high an obstacle, so she turned to Nashville, a city she had visited extensively. "I was hell bent on living in a big city and I just couldn't work up the nerve to come back to the South," she says. "[When I did,] Nashville was the obvious choice for me because of my fondness for it."

Once in town, she released the 2011 album Walk of Shame to rave reviews, as well as opening High Class Hillbilly, a pop-up vintage clothing stall, where a chance meeting with Auerbach turned into a full-fledged partnership. "During the first round of recordings, I was in an awkward mood every night I left the studio," she says. "It was hard for me to trust that Dan was right when he said I should move a verse around or add an extra chorus. He pushed to find the right feel for each track one by one, and a few months later I found myself with a damn good record."
Paul Cauthen
Paul Cauthen remembers sitting alone in an Austin house after a weekend-long bender. A life making music seemed to be slipping away. Wide awake with nothing to lose, he fell on his hands and knees right there, bowed his head, and threw down a divine gauntlet.

"I dared Him," Cauthen says, recalling his desperate challenge to God. "I said, 'Use me. I'll be a rag doll. Just put me out there, let's go. I dare you.'"

Most people don't plead in the form of a dare. That blend of vulnerability and brash confidence is part of what makes Cauthen and his music––which often hinges on the same paradox––so compelling. Whether it was by heavenly intervention or sheer force of will, Cauthen emerged with My Gospel (Lightning Rod Records), his mesmerizing full-length solo debut. Produced by Beau Bedford, the record is both an artistic and personal triumph. My Gospel captures a young artist in full possession of a raw virtuosity that must sometimes feel like a burden: If your singing takes listeners on white-knuckle rides and you write like a hard-luck Transcendentalist poet who abandoned the East Coast for the desert, you'd better do both. Anything else just wouldn't feel like living. "I don't know what else I'm supposed to do in life," Cauthen says. "So I just kept on working. Even when I didn't hardly have money to eat, my songs allowed me to get into the studios. I wrote my way into this thing."

The album is called My Gospel, but make no mistake: These are songs about Earthly struggles to love, connect, and just get by. "I'm not super religious," Cauthen says. "I don't believe God is this guy wearing a white cloak who comes down with wings and beautiful sandals. I do believe that people are put into other people's lives for reasons, and those reasons are unexplained. I believe that is God."
Red Shahan
For the better part of a year now, Texas singer-songwriter Red Shahan has had his full-length debut, Men & Coyotes, in the works.

"In the works." It's a strange way to describe the making of an album. Though Men & Coyotes may have only been assembled in it's current incarnation this past year, but you could make the case that Shahan has been working on this moment his whole life.

At twelve songs long, Men & Coyotes works it's way through the world of worn out cowboys, hard-working mothers, agonized loners, earnest sons, broken men, scorn lovers, and the ever searching songwriter. Though he morphs in and out of character, there's no doubt there's a bit of Shahan nestled within the soul of each. Shahan shows an intensity and prowess to write about the difficult junctures within one's life without sugar-coating or holding back.

The gritty songwriter comes from a long lineage of Lubbock artists who broke into the forefront across the callous stages of the lonesome West Texas town that he comes from.

There's a sense of desperation in Shahan's voice throughout Men & Coyotes. It's the struggle of a songwriter and man fracturing the wall between him and the listener. Often, he's West Texas Dust. At others, he's East Texas Rust. Desolate lines pop up before you in vivid color. Gut-wrenching pieces pierce you in unsettling ways that you've only known when inside that isolated room in the dark crevices of your head. All the while, textured guitars and sharp drums are the landscape in which Shahan's lyrics are able to take shape and form. There's a story the music tells simultaneously to Shahan's howls.